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What's On? 

My What's On page is packed full of interviews and information about what exciting shows are coming your way over the next season. Click the link to find out more and see some trailers below. 

Today this could be the greatest day of our lives... I went to see Take That at Milton Keynes Stadium this week. Find out what I thought about the This Life tour in my review here.

TT Black (Jasmine Storm)
TT Colour (Jasmine Storm)
TT Purple (Jasmine Storm)
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Latest blog - You are beautiful, no matter what they say...

My latest blog is about Botox and fillers, the dangers of AI and how it impacts our self-esteem.

Read all about my thoughts on this here. 

Pop Idle

A new book telling the light-hearted and cautionary tales of a professional working singer in the UK. 

 

Like hordes of others, Dave Dawson has spent decades crisscrossing the country as a solo full-time professional musician. During his 30 years on the road, he has performed thousands of shows before tens of thousands of people, yet still remains one of the army of anonymous entertainers who literally sing for their supper, as part of the Never Ending UK Tour. From pubs to clubs, dives to luxury hotels, theatres to gardens, and hen nights to care homes, there’s hardly a live environment that he hasn’t encountered, enjoyed or endured.

 

Along the way, he’s had brushes with fame and fandom, strippers and stalkers, crooks and colourful characters, pissed-up punters and prima donnas…  and has banked a wealth of experience at the brunt of the live music circuit.

 

In this, his fifth book, Dave takes the reader with him as he encounters the Great British Public head on with only a microphone stand and an ad-lib to hide behind. Alongside light-hearted and cautionary tales, Pop Idle provides an invaluable insight into the pleasures and perils that await anyone dedicated or mad enough to want to forge a path into the music industry at the bottom rung of the showbiz ladder  

 

Dave Dawson, under the pseudonym Dave Philpott, is the co-author of the cult comedy bestsellers, Dear Mr. Kershaw, Dear Mr Pop Star, Grammar Free In The UK and Dear Catherine Wheel

 

Amazon Worldwide https://shorturl.at/tEFS6

Amazon UK https://shorturl.at/buzFH

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On the day we lost Bowie, eight years on, I was invited onto Stony Radio to talk about his impact on me and what I love about him. Thanks to Caz at Stony Radio for inviting me along. 

Listen here. 

Take That and Party

My latest blog talks about the stress of securing Take That tickets. Read it here

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The End Of An Era

Only After Dark is closing down. I have written a personal account of my time there called Goodbye OAD

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Lest We Forget You Mr Bowie

10 January 2023

 

Has it really been seven years? Seven years today since we lost David Bowie; icon, legend and the most important musical influence in my life. 

I've written a few words on my Bowie page but let me just say, I will never forget you Mr Bowie. 

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Coming up to a big age I find myself reflecting a lot on the past.  I feel very lucky to have grown up in the post punk generation.  We learnt early about diversity and accepting each other for our differences.  There were punks, new romantics and even the odd rocker all getting along together.  This was in the days before ‘Goth’ existed.  I classed myself as ‘Alternative’ and still prefer that term today.  I don’t like to be catagorised into a box and really threw people when I told them enjoyed a bit of Abba.

The post punk generation was creative.  We made our own fashions and music.  Never had

bands been so stylish!  But it wasn’t just about looks.  The new electronic sounds coming out

of this era was like nothing that had been heard before.  David Bowie himself went backstage

at an early Human League gig and told them they were the future of music.  A high accolade.

But most of all we all believed we could achieve our dreams.  It was an exciting and vibrant

times, full of colour with big hair, big make up and big ambitions.  My dreams have changed

a bit over the years.  Back then, I dreamed of being an actress (I do have Lamda qualifications)

and loved being on the stage.  But dreams change as you grow and now instead of being on

the stage I review a lot of theatre instead.  This is not the frustrations of an actress that never

quite made it…this is actually where I want to be.  I love going to theatre and gigs and turning a big number isn’t going to change a thing.

So despite a few more days of clinging onto my 40’s for dear life I have forgotten that turning 50 means…

1) I qualify for saga and that awful life assurance for the over 50s!
2) Travel insurance goes up
3) Age UK can support me

Well f**k that shit.... if you know me you know that nothing will change.  I will still be gigging and reviewing.  I'm still me!

 

How many 50 year olds crimp their hair and wear dresses like me?  We are the post punk generation and the rules are about to change!!

 

Looking back is for old folk. And I'm not old! The best is yet to come!

A Significant Birthday

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